Author Archives: talkingphysics

Programming Games with Python

I’ll be giving a talk at the Science Olympiad Nationals being held here at UW-Stout on gaming physics engines. I thought I’d put up a few resources related to my talk and add some resources on how to get started … Continue reading

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List of SBG Resources

There are quite a few other bloggers that I relied on to get started with learning objectives based grading. Here is a good collection of the links I’ve found invaluable in getting started. Blogs on SBG Shawn Cornally at ThinkThankThunk … Continue reading

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Relativity – Part I: Why is Relativity Exciting to Study?

2015 is the 100th anniversary of Einstein’s general theory of relativity.  In particular, on November 25, 1915, Einstein published the gravitational field equations of general relativity.  Ten years prior, in 1905, Einstein published his special theory of relativity.  To celebrate … Continue reading

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Special Relativity for K12 Students

I put the attached activity together for a group of K12 instructors. I would expect that a high school physics student should be able to complete the entire packet and lower grades can work through parts of the activity. Feel … Continue reading

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Intro to Electromagnetism – Next Gen Science Standards Workshop

Last summer a group of faculty at UW-Stout hosted a group of high school instructors from the area to work on activities related to the Next Generation Science Standards. I’ve attached the activity I developed for the workshop. Feel free … Continue reading

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Energy vs. Momentum – The Veritasium Video

A couple of days ago I noticed a blog post from Chad Orzel entitled How Deep Does Veritasium’s Bullet Go?.  It links to a video by Veritasium that asks which block goes higher, one shot with a bullet on center, … Continue reading

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Why is Multiplication Harder than Addition?

I’m in the process of writing a couple of blog posts about slide rules, and an interesting questions occurred to me, which spawned this post. Why is addition so much easier than multiplication? The power of slide rules comes from … Continue reading

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