Standards for Matter & Interaction

Thanks to Frank Noschese over at Action-Reaction I didn’t have to start this list from scratch. He had a list of standards for the 2nd edition of Matter & Interaction by Chabay and Sherwood so all I needed to do was update it for the 3rd edition. I’m pretty excited about uses standards-based grading now that I have all my standards in hand. It seems much more manageable. For keeping track of it all I’ve decided to try ActiveGrade. I know some people use Excel, pen and paper, or Google Docs for keeping track of the standards but I wanted something the students could check on to see how they are doing and I wanted to involve the least amount of hassle on my part.

So here are the standards. There is also link to a Google Doc if you’d like to download these. Feel free to use them in your classes. All I ask in return is that you give back to the community and share, either by posting the changes you make or write about your experience somewhere online. I’m a big believer in open source and creative commons and all that so please give back to the online community.

Matter & Interaction Standards
(Based on 3rd edition of text)

Chapter 1: Interaction and Motion
1.1 – I can provide arguments for whether interactions are present for a given situation.
1.2 I can relate the fact that an object undergoes uniform motion to the fact that it must experience no net interaction in this case.
1.3 – I can articulate the difference between a vector and a scalar.
1.4 – I can find the magnitude of a vector.
1.5 – I can calculate the unit vector in the direction of a specified vector.
1.6 – I can use vector notation for appropriate quantities (such as momentum).
1.7 – I can calculate the average velocity of an object.
1.8 – I can add and subtract vectors graphically and algebraically.
1.9 – I can calculate the change in a vector quantity graphically and algebraically.
1.10 – I can use the position update formula to relate changes in the position of an object to its average velocity.
1.11 – I can use the position update formula to calculate the time taken for an object to move from an initial to a final location.
1.12 – I can draw arrows to represent the velocity (or momentum) of an object at a particular location along its trajectory.
1.13 – I can write the definition of momentum.
1.14 – I can articulate when it is appropriate to use a non-relativistic approximation.
1.15 – I can calculate the momentum of a particle at any speed.
1.16 – I can calculate the average rate of change of momentum.
VP1.1 – I can use VPython to animate an object moving with constant velocity.
VP1.2 – I can use VPython to draw a vector moving with an object.
VP1.3 – I can use VPython to leave a trail behind a moving object.

Chapter 2: The Momentum Principle
2.1 – I can clearly specify the system and the surroundings for every problem.
2.2 – I can apply the momentum principle to solve problems.
2.3 – I can calculate the net force experienced by an object.
2.4 – I can use the momentum update formula to relate changes in the momentum of an object/system to the net force.
2.5 – I can apply appropriate assumptions to use the position (or momentum) update formula.
2.6– I can predict motion iteratively when forces are changing.
2.7 – I can calculate the vector force due to a stretched spring.
2.8 – I can interpret/draw the position-time and velocity-time and force-time graphs for an object.
2.9 – I can list the forces exerted on a system and draw free body diagrams for the system.
2.10 – I can relate the momentum principle to the vector trajectory of an object subject to a constant force.
2.11 – I can estimate interaction times by making educated assumptions.
2.12 – I can explain what is meant by and defend the use of physical models.
2.13 – I can assess the appropriateness of approximations for a given physical model.
2.14 – I can use the momentum principle to relate the initial and final momentum of a system.
VP2.1 – I can write a VPython program that models an object moving under the influence of a constant force.

Chapter 3: The Fundamental Interactions
3.1 – I can list the four fundamental types of interactions.
3.2 – I can calculate the (vector) gravitational force exerted by one object on another.
3.3 – I can use a force law to update the momentum and position of an object.
3.4 – I can relate the momentum principle to the vector trajectory of an object subject to a spring force.
3.5 – I can relate the momentum principle to the vector trajectory of an object subject to a gravitational force.
3.6 – I can utilize the approximation for the gravitational force near the surface of the earth.
3.7 – I can calculate the (vector) electric force exerted by one charged object on another.
3.8 – I can compare the electric force to the gravitational force between the two charged particles.
3.9 – I can apply the property of “reciprocity” to forces between two particles.
3.10 – I can use the conservation of momentum to solve a problem involving momentum transfer between a system and its surroundings.
3.11 – I can find the center of mass velocity of a system
3.12 – I can apply the momentum principle to a system consisting of many particles.
3.13 – I can list the reasons our deterministic model has limitations.
VP3.1 – I can write a VPython program that numerically solve iterative problems and display trajectories for changing forces.

Chapter 4: Contact Interactions
4.1 – I can use the ball and spring model for solids to determine the diameter of an atom in a solid.
4.2 – I can use the ball and spring model for solids to determine the interatomic spring stiffness for a solid.
4.3 – I can apply Young’s Modulus in both macroscopic and microscopic forms to solve problems.
I can calculate the sliding or static friction exerted on an object.
4.4 – I know the difference between period, frequency, and angular frequency.
4.5 – I can relate the period/angular frequency of oscillation for horizontal/vertical springs to the spring constant and mass.
4.6 – I can graphically represent the motion of an oscillator given properties of its behavior.
4.7 – I can algebraically represent the motion of an oscillator given properties of its behavior.
4.8 – I can use the ball and spring model for solids to determine the speed of sound in a solid.
4.9 – I can use dimensional analysis to find approximate expressions for physical quantities.
4.10 – I am able to describe the microscopic origin of buoyant forces and fluid pressure.
4.11 – I can determine when buoyant forces can be neglected.

Chapter 5: Rate of Change of Momentum
5.1 – I can draw free body diagrams for a system, using our notation conventions.
5.2 – I can resolve vector forces into components.
5.3 – I can calculate the forces and tensions on a system in static equilibrium.
5.4 – I can distinguish between a system momentarily at rest and a system undergoing uniform motion.
5.5 – I understand how the parallel and perpendicular components of the net force affect an object’s motion.
5.6 – I can apply the derivative form of the momentum principle to curving motion with parallel and perpendicular components.
5.7 – I can draw a vector to represent an object’s rate of change of momentum.
5.8 – I can identify the directions and causes of forces as our body perceives them.
VP5.1 – I can write a VPython program that shows an object moving in an orbit and uses vectors to display the velocity, momentum, and/or force components perpendicular and parallel to the direction of motion.

Chapter 6: The Energy Principle
6.1 – I can calculate the energy of a particle at any speed.
6.2 – I can calculate the rest energy of a particle.
6.3 – I can calculate the kinetic energy of a particle at any speed.
6.4 – I can calculate the work done by a constant force.
6.5 – I can calculate the dot product of two vectors.
6.6 – I can apply the energy principle to solve problems.
6.7 – I can calculate energies in eV or in J.
6.8 – I can calculate the work done by a non-constant force.
6.9 – I know the properties of potential energy and the relationship between force and potential energy.
6.10 – I can calculate the potential energy of a system of two or more gravitationally interacting particles.
6.11 – I can calculate the potential energy of a system of two or more electrically interacting particles.
6.12 – I can draw/interpret graphs of potential, kinetic, and total energy as a function of position.
6.13 –I am able to determine the limits on the possible motion of a system based on energy-considerations.
6.14 – I can calculate the masses and binding energies involved in nuclear processes.
6.15– I can select appropriate initial and final states for multi-state problems.
VP6.1 – I can write a VPython program that shows the energies of a moving object.

Chapter 7: Internal Energy
7.1 – I can calculate the spring potential energy for ideal macroscopic springs.
7.2 – I can use springs to model interatomic interactions.
7.3 – I can articulate the meaning of and importance of the path independence of potential energy.
7.4 – I can calculate the change in thermal energy of an object/system.
7.5 – I can relate the air resistance force on an object to the speed of that object and the shape of that object.
7.6 – I can explain “terminal speed” in terms of forces acting on an object.

Chapter 8: Energy Quantization
8.1 – I can explain what a photon is and how it relates to the electromagnetic field.
8.2 – I can relate the wavelength to the energy of a photon.
8.3 – I can calculate the energy levels of a hydrogen atom.
8.4 – I can explain how an atomic or molecular system gets excited to a higher state or relaxes to a lower state.
8.5 – I can relate the energy of an emitted or absorbed photon and the energy levels of the hydrogen atom involved in the transition.
8.6 – I can explain what quantization means and we can observe the effects of quantization.
8.7 – I can calculate the vibrational energy levels of a system.
8.8 – I know the approximate energy level spacings of various systems.

Chapter 9: Multiparticle Systems
9.1 – I can determine the location of the center of mass of an object/system.
9.2 – I can correctly apply the energy principle to the point-particle system.
9.3 – I can correctly apply the energy principle to the real system.
9.4 – I can combine the energy equations for both the real system and point-particle system to solve problems.
9.5 – I can determine the translational kinetic energy of an object/system.
9.6 – I can determine kinetic energy relative to the center of mass of a system.
9.7 – I can calculate the rotational inertia of an object/system.
9.8 – I can calculate the rotational kinetic energy of an object/system.

Chapter 10: Collisions
10.1 – I know when the momentum of a system is conserved in a collision.
10.2 – I know when the kinetic energy and internal energy of a system is conserved in a collision.
10.3 – I can use the momentum principle to solve 1D collision problems.
10.4 – I can use the energy principle to solve 1D collision problems.
10.5 – I can use the center of mass frame to solve1D collision problems.
10.6 – I can use the momentum principle to solve 2D and 3D collision problems.
10.7 – I can use the energy principle to solve 2D and 3D collision problems.
10.8 – I can use the center of mass frame to solve 2D and 3D collision problems.
10.9 – I can describe the expected and actual results of the Rutherford experiment.
VP10.1 – I can create a VPython simulation of a collision experiment.

Chapter 11: Angular Momentum
11.1 – I can calculate the angular momentum of an object/system (translational, rotational, total).
11.2 – I can apply the relationship v=ωr when appropriate.
11.3 – I can calculate the cross product of two vectors.
11.4 – I can calculate the torque due a force with respect to a particular location.
11.5 – I can combine two or three different fundamental principles to solve complicated problems.
11.6 -I can identify whether the torque on a system is zero or non-zero.
11.7 – I can apply the angular momentum principle to isolated systems and systems with a net external torque.
11.8 – I can use the angular momentum principle to predict the location of a spinning object.
11.9 – I can discuss the consequences of angular momentum quantization of atomic-scale systems.

Chapter 12: Entropy: Limits on the Possible
12.1 – I can describe the Einstein model for a solid.
12.2 – I can use the Einstein model for a solid to distribute energy among objects.
12.3 – I can articulate the difference between a “microstate” and a “macrostate”.
12.4 – I can state the fundamental assumption of statistical mechanics.
12.5 – I can determine the number of ways to arrange q quanta of energy among N one-dimensional oscillators.
12.6 – I calculate the entropy of a system.
12.7 – I can explain, using statistical mechanics, why objects always end up in thermal equilibrium.
12.8 – I can recognize different statements of the second law of thermodynamics.
12.9 – I can compare reversible and irreversible processes (in terms of entropy).
12.10 – I can calculate the entropy change associated with a small amount of thermal transfer of energy.
12.11 – I can calculate the approximate temperature for a nanoparticle with a certain quanta of energy.
12.12 – I can calculate the specific heat capacity for an Einstein solid.
12.13 – I can calculate the probability of finding energy E in a system using the Boltzmann distribution.
12.14 – I can calculate the speed distribution of a gas.
12.15 – I can articulate the difference between average speed and RMS speed.
VP12.1 – Use VPython to model the distribution of quanta in a system of two blocks.

Chapter 13: Gases and Engines
13.1 – I know the difference between number density and density.
13.2 – I can calculate the average flow rate of a gas.
13.3 – I can find the mean free path of a particle in a gas.
13.4 – I can apply the ideal gas law to a system.
13.5 – I can calculate the work done by a piston on a gas.
13.6 – I can represent a thermodynamic process on a PV diagram.
13.7 – I can calculate energy transfers during a thermodynamic process.
13.8 – I can calculate the rate of energy transfer due to temperature differences.
13.9 – I can calculate the entropy change of a thermodynamic process.
13.10 – I can calculate the efficiency of an engine.

VPython – General
VP0.1 – I can write a correctly working program that has all the required features.
VP0.2 – I can output values that are labeled and have correct units.
VP0.3 – I can write a program with logical variable names, structure, and organization.
VP0.4 – I can use comments to describe the physical reasoning and the function of the code.

Here is the whole list in Google Doc format.

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One Response to Standards for Matter & Interaction

  1. Pingback: My First Half-Term with Standards-Based Grading (Learning-Objectives-Based Grading) | Talking Physics

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